For aircraft to achieve flight, many engines utilize powerful combustion chambers that burn fuel constantly. With this combustion of fuel, intense amounts of heat is created, upwards of 3,500 degrees Fahrenheit. While much of this is vented out of the aircraft as exhaust, there still remains a great amount of heat that must be dissipated, lest it cause the engine to overheat, damage components, reduce the engine’s life, and more.

Oil lubrication is one method in which engine parts can further be cooled. Lubricant systems coat the engine components with a layer of oils, utilizing a dry or wet sump lubrication system. This oil is able to absorb heat from the engine components, helping to cool them down. After, the oil is moved to an oil cooling system where the heat can be removed utilizing a radiator. While oil cooling can account for nearly half of the heat removal of a system after exhaust, it is unable to cool the entire system, thus aircraft also rely on other methods as well.

Air cooling through the use of bleed air is another method that accounts for much of the heat removal of the engine. Utilizing air inlets, air can enter the engine compartment and flow around the cylinders and other components before exiting through the cowling. Cowl flaps which bring in cool air can be controlled hydraulically or manually, but there is a tradeoff with increased drag. While air cooling can be less effective during lower speeds, there are also controls put in place to limit the amount of air as too much can be detrimental with temperature fluctuation. Times in which air can be too cold include the winter season or very high altitudes.

Altogether, there are many ways in which an engine can reduce the great amounts of heat that they produce. Through exhaust, oil, and air, most heat can be removed so that there is little to no damage caused to the aircraft engine parts. This keeps the life expectancy of components longer, as well as protects the aircraft and pilot from any danger that could be caused by excessive heat.

At Just NSN Parts, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find aircraft engine cooling parts you need, new or obsolete. As a premier supplier of parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries, we're always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@justnsnparts.com or call us at +1-714-705-4780.


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Plastics are an extremely important part of the aerospace industry, having been commonly used ever since 1970. Plastics excel at reducing weight and improving fuel efficiency, two major considerations in aircraft design, with components for propulsion, navigation, structural elements, and interior all made out of plastic materials. In this blog, we’ll explore five types of plastics commonly used by aircraft manufacturers.

The first is polyetheretherketone, the preferred polymer of the aerospace industry. Polyetheretherketone is commonly used in conditions where exposure to low temperatures and atmospheric particles frequently occurs, and is often used in pump gears and valve seals. It can also withstand high amounts of radiation and has great resistance against hydrolysis, allowing it to survive high pressures of water and steam without degrading.

Polyamide-imide, or PAI, is commonly used in place of metal components, due to being chemical and radiation-resistant, as well as flame-retardant. Even when burning, PAI does not give off smoke, making it ideal for applications where there is a risk of fire.

Polychlorotrifluoroethylene, or PCTFE, is typically used in or around corrosive environments. A fluorochemical plastic with strong physical and mechanical properties, it is also chemical and fire resistant, and boasts low moisture absorption. PCTFE can tolerate temperature extremes of -400 to 400 degrees Fahrenheit

Typically used to insulate cables and wires within an aircraft, polytetrafluoroethylene, or PTFE, is a fluorocarbon polymer and electrical insulator. With high tear resistance, low flammability, and the ability to retain its properties in aerospace conditions, PTFE is a favored choice for protecting wiring and connectors inside an aircraft.

Lastly is thermosetting polyimide, a commonly used plastic in structural applications. Typically seen in insulators and electrical spacers for threaded nuts and other components, thermosetting polyimide has high chemical resistance and excellent mechanical properties, with higher ductility than ceramics and lower weight than metals.

At Just NSN Parts, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the aircraft plastic parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@justnsnparts.com or call us at +1-714-705-4780.


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So how high do planes fly? This is a question many people have asked themselves before embarking a flight trip. Looking through your airplane window at the ground and seeing the ground slowly getting farther and farther away, it’s no surprise that the question gets googled frequently. It can be somewhat unnerving to be so high up, so a clear clarification on your altitude can be somewhat reassuring. To understand just how high planes typically go up, see the simple explanation below. 

Simply put, the average commercial aircraft will cruise at an altitude of 30,000 - 42,000 ft (which equates to 9,000 – 13,000 meters). In simpler terms, commercial aircraft can go about 5-7 miles in the air, depending on the route. For some deeper insight, Mount Everest, reaches an altitude of 29,029 ft which equates to about 5 and a half miles. In summation, the average aircraft will climb and cruise at altitudes higher than the tallest mountain in the world.

Some might find that fact a little daunting, but the reality in aviation is that, the higher the plane, the better the fuel efficiency and the better the flight. A jet engine can operate more efficiently at a higher altitude than at a lower altitude. This is because the air is much thinner, thus allowing the aircraft to travel faster while burning less fuel.

Air at higher altitude is not only thinner, it has less drag (the resistance that pulls against the aircraft during flight and takeoff).  Thinner air benefits the aircraft in that the engines are able to run closer to their maximum RPM limit or maximum (exhaust) temperature limitations. At lower altitudes, the engines can only be run at maximum thrust during take-off or perhaps the climb or else the aircraft would quickly exceed its maximum speed limitation. For more information on aircraft components, contact the folks at 

At Just NSN Parts, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the unique parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at  sales@justnsnparts.comor call us at 714-705-4780.


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Ambulances aren’t just used on the ground to help trauma patients. “Air ambulance” refers to any form of medical transport that relies on flight for its method of travel, rather than the white-and-red trucks one typically sees on the streets. However, the term “air ambulance” is used for both fixed-wing aircraft and rotary-wing helicopters.

Fixed-wing aircraft consist of conventional airplanes that feature a set of wings that provide lift, and one or more engines that provide thrust via propellers or jet propulsion. Rotary-wing aircraft, however, rely on a vertical mast connected to engines and a set of horizontally-mounted propellers to provide both lift and thrust, which enable the aircraft to take off, land, and maneuver vertically. Both fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft are used as ambulances, each with distinct advantages over conventional ground ambulances in terms of speed. In emergency trauma situations, there is often a very narrow timespan to get the patient or patients to a trauma center to maximize their chances of survival and recovery, after all.

Many emergency professionals will call for air transport when travel time to the patient took too long, when the nearest trauma center is too far away (typically 20 to 25 miles or more), when traffic conditions make travel by ground too difficult, if the emergency involved multiple patients who would overwhelm a single trauma center, or if the patient in question requires Advanced Life Support-levels of care.

Both rotary-wing and fixed-wing aircraft play very different roles in terms of medical ambulances. Helicopters are often used as a substitute for ground ambulances, as their Vertical Take Off and Landing (VTOL) capabilities let them land almost anywhere. This is exceedingly useful for when the accident has occurred in a difficult-to-reach area, such as in the wilderness. However, the limited fuel capacity of helicopters impairs their range, so they are most frequently used in emergency situations. Fixed-wing aircraft require dedicated runways to take off and land, but they are much faster than helicopters and can travel much further. Therefore, fixed-wing air ambulances are more often used to transport patients from one hospital to another.

At Just NSN-Parts, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the air ambulance parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@justnsnparts.com or call us at +1-714-705-4780.


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Airports and the world of aviation as a whole have their own unique language. It’s easy to get lost in the slew of acronyms, abbreviations and other denotations. Here is a helpful list of few airport abbreviations you’ve heard, and a few you haven’t:

A/C - Aircraft: An airplane, helicopter, or other machine capable of flight.

ACID - Aircraft Identification: The number in the FAA registry used to differentiate aircraft.

ADG - Airplane Design Group: Aircraft groupings defined by the FAA

AFP - Area Flight Plan: Documents filed with the FAA denoting the intended path of an aircraft.

APP - Approach: The final descent and alignment of an airplane onto the runway.

ATC - Air Traffic Control: A service provided by ground-based controllers who direct aircraft both on the ground and in controlled airspace.

CAA - Civil Aviation Authority: Corporation that oversees and regulates all facets of civil aviation in the United Kingdom. It is the U.K. equivalent to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration.

DH - Decision Height: Decision height refers to the lowest height at which, if the required visual reference to continue the approach is not visible, the pilot must begin procedure for a missed approach.

DoD - Department of Defense: Executive branch of the U.S. government in charge of agencies and functions of the government related to national security and armed forces.

FAA - Federal Aviation Administration: U.S. Governing body with power to regulate civil aviation.

FBO - Fixed Base Operator: Organization at an airport that provides services like fueling, hangaring, small maintenance, and other generic needs.

HDQ - FAA Headquarters: The acronym given to the headquarters of the FAA located in Washington, D.C.

IFSS - International Flight Service Station: An IFSS is an air traffic facility that provides pilots with information during flights. Unlike Air Traffic Control, an IFSS is not responsible for giving instructions or clearances.

Hopefully this gives you a better idea of some words and phrases you may have heard at an airport or read on our website.

At Just NSN Parts, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the unique parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@justnsnparts.com or call us at 1-714-705-4780.


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